Today’s Feature, October 6th & 7th: The Transfer

October 6, 2007 at 4:03 am (Today's Feature)

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It may sound a little depressing, but I don’t make it out west too often. Several friends of mine however have made the trip out to Hollywood or Los Angeles and many of them have stayed for good. They, like so many other dreamy-eyed 20-somethings have been drawn there for one reason- to make it; to cure their lofty aspirations with riches and recognition. It’s no surprise the music scene in the Golden State is over saturated, but bands like The Transfer don’t mind. This 6-man army thrives on the cutthroat environment the scene creates, bundling together their collective experience and dashing through different dimensions of style and genre to create their own distinctive melodies that include two leading front vocalists taking rap-rock to a new level.

You could describe the band’s sound as “a modern blend of rock and soul, with deep roots in hip-hop,” and they feel that they fit “somewhere between Maroon 5 and Gym Class Heroes.” No matter how you depict The Transfer, they make their talent clear. They pride themselves on the ability to crank out a legitimate ballad tune and directly follow it up with a hip-hop track that will flip the mood on the dance floor.

And it isn’t simply the sound of The Transfer that makes them exceptional – they realize it takes more than that to stand out in an over-whelming scene. Their written word will challenge you as a listener, for they understand how to connect with an audience; that songs can’t be written on a whim, but in “the baggage of everyday life.” These guys have figured out “if you are just aware of what’s going on within yourself, there is always something to say.”

While the band is currently working on their first formal release for the end of the year, you can soon catch some of their work on MTV’s “The Hills” and “Newport Harbor.” They’ll be hitting the road in their 15-passenger van come February, so keep a look out. If you find yourself at a Transfer show, make sure all six members are accounted for – like they say, it’s hard to keep track of six people. Now get into their XXQ’s.

t may sound a little depressing, but I don’t make it out west too often. Several friends of mine however have made the trip out to Hollywood or Los Angeles and many of them have stayed for good. They, like so many other dreamy-eyed 20-somethings have been drawn there for one reason- to make it; to cure their lofty aspirations with riches and recognition. It’s no surprise the music scene in the Golden State is over saturated, but bands like The Transfer don’t mind. This 6-man army thrives on the cutthroat environment the scene creates, bundling together their collective experience and dashing through different dimensions of style and genre to create their own distinctive melodies that include two leading front vocalists taking rap-rock to a new level.

You could describe the band’s sound as “a modern blend of rock and soul, with deep roots in hip-hop,” and they feel that they fit “somewhere between Maroon 5 and Gym Class Heroes.” No matter how you depict The Transfer, they make their talent clear. They pride themselves on the ability to crank out a legitimate ballad tune and directly follow it up with a hip-hop track that will flip the mood on the dance floor.

And it isn’t simply the sound of The Transfer that makes them exceptional – they realize it takes more than that to stand out in an over-whelming scene. Their written word will challenge you as a listener, for they understand how to connect with an audience; that songs can’t be written on a whim, but in “the baggage of everyday life.” These guys have figured out “if you are just aware of what’s going on within yourself, there is always something to say.”

While the band is currently working on their first formal release for the end of the year, you can soon catch some of their work on MTV’s “The Hills” and “Newport Harbor.” They’ll be hitting the road in their 15-passenger van come February, so keep a look out. If you find yourself at a Transfer show, make sure all six members are accounted for Ð like they say, it’s hard to keep track of six people. Now get into their XXQ’s.

XXQs: The Transfer (T-Time and MARC)

PEV: How and when did The Transfer first form as a band?

T-TIME: After a bunch of different bands, we all ended up in LA and started playing together around March of this year. Marc and Matt met in high school, I met Marc in college, and we all ended up joining together as a crew in Hollywood.

PEV: Growing up, what was the music scene like for you and who were you listening to?

T-TIME: I grew up in Seattle, we used to go to the Sit n Spin Laundromat on Sundays to hear local hip-hop. The scene was cool, the grunge thing was dying down and there was a lot of pseudo-intelligent “underground” hip-hop going on. I sort of rebelled because I wanted to make pop music. When I was little, I listened to Outkast because of my older sisters and The Beatles because of my parents.

PEV: The Transfer uses both a singer and rapper to front vocals; Why did you decide to use this style?

T-TIME: We’ve got this question before, it basically just happened because Marc was singing a lot when we joined up, and I had been doing the rap thing solo, so we each stepped on stage and did what we do best.

PEV: What was it like the first time The Transfer stepped into a recording studio to record your own music? What was going through your heads?

T-Time: It’s a really interesting (hectic) environment writing and recording with six people, we each respect each others opinions, but we all have different ideas on where things should go and how they’ll sound best, so sometimes it’s easier to kick a couple of the guys out and record things in smaller groups. In the end it’s just cool to have a million different smart ideas bouncing around in the studio.

PEV: You’ve have songs appear on MTV’s “The Hills” and “Newport Harbor”. How has the impact of national TV exposure helped your music and did you like the way they used your songs?

T-Time: We actually just recently licensed the music to MTV, so we’re waiting to see how the reaction is when it airs on TV. Stay tuned on that.

PEV: The Transfer is from Hollywood, California, what is the current Hollywood/LA music scene like right now?

T-Time: There’s so many bands out here that it gets a little overwhelming and over saturated, but it’s a competitive environment so it makes it an absolute necessity to write good music. It seems like every day a new emo/pop/punk/hip-hop/American apparel hybrid band comes out, but the whole genre blending thing is cool, it’s pushing the boundaries.

PEV: You describe your sound, as somewhere between Maroon 5 and Gym Class Heroes. How is The Transfer’s sound and music different from anything else out there today?

T-Time: We feel like there’s not a lot of bands that can come at you with a ballad, and then the next song be a legitimate hip-hop track, and actually do both well. We feel like our guitar parts are gonna be different than anything you hear in hip-hop, and our verses are gonna be different than anything you hear in rock. I think since we all came from different backgrounds, we’ve had to hone our styles and art forms solo, so bringing it together just makes a stronger army.

PEV: What can people expect from a live Transfer show?

T-Time: Expect to dance, expect to feel something strongly and expect to be surprised.

PEV: Finish this sentence, “The most embarrassing time for The Transfer was when…”

T-Time: When every show one of the guys is missing right when we’re supposed to go on stage. It’s like an everyday thing, it’s hard to keep track of six people.

PEV: What is the best thing about living on the west coast that you can’t find anywhere else in the country?

T-Time: Seattle.

PEV: When you sit down to write music, what kind of element do you surround yourselves in?

MARC: Usually a few dirty dishes, some piles of laundry, we surround ourselves with the baggage of our every day life. There is always space to write music, that’s one of the best things about it.

PEV: Describe to us your creative methods. Are you jotting down notes all day? Carry a recorder around with you?

MARC: When your whole life is centered around music, I think you are always subconsciously writing. It doesn’t need to be forced, if you are just aware of what’s going on within yourself there is always something to say.

PEV: You have traveled all over in your 15 passenger van. What has been your favorite place to play and why?

MARC: I think my favorite place was, as odd as it sounds, an attic in a frat house at University of Washington. It was like 100 degrees and packed from wall to wall, it was the kind of environment where you can completely let go on stage. Being on the road it is easier to be free as a performer, in LA you are always playing in front of your great Aunt Joan, or your moms friend from college, it’s a little more controlled.

PEV: What are the best and worst parts about “life on the road”?

MARC: The best part is waking up everyday in a new city, seeing new faces, surviving on cashews and white cheddar cheese-its, rocking shows whether they be in packed auditoriums or a friends backyard. Just being all about what you love is the best part. So far there have honestly been no downs.

PEV: Is there an artist today that you think is up and coming and we should all be looking out for?

MARC: We are involved with a lot of very talented artists the world will soon hear about. Young Murph, a rapper from Oakland who is just an amazing performer and overall songwriter, a band we perform with often called Aurum Star from LA. We also have a musical family out in Australia that includes DJ Rush and Omar Musa from Canberra.

PEV: When you get time to relax, what can we find you doing in your spare time?

MARC: If I’m not doing music I’m playing basketball, that was my first love and I always find time to get back to it. We eat a lot of sushi at the Asian Sunset cafe also.

PEV: Describe to us an average “show day” for The Transfer. Any pre-show rituals?

MARC: We usually hit up a thrift store, find some weird colorful scarf for T-Time or some other interesting article of clothing to wear. Our biggest pre-show ritual is our energy ball routine… I can’t give you too many details but that’s what sets it all off.

PEV: In one word, describe The Transfer?

MARC: Coldbeast

PEV: If you could collaborate with one artist today, who would it be and why?

MARC: John Fruscante from the RHCP, cause as Matt puts it…“he’s a genius.”

PEV: So, what is next for The Transfer?

MARC: We’re working on our first formal release which should be out by years end, and then getting on the road for a nationwide tour in February. Keep in touch with us on the MySpace, we’ll be in your city soon!

For more information on Verona Grove, check out http://www.TheTransferMusic.com 

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